Thanks for the very informative and comprehensive session on equality law today. Lot’s to think about in terms of how we balance everyone’s needs.

HR, Morrison’s Supermarkets

A very informative day. I learned a great deal about the history and legal aspects around safeguarding in health and education.

Paula, Psychologist, Midlands

Constructive information to take back to colleagues.

Lucy, HR, Birmingham

Thankyou. It is vital that accurate info about the equalities act is made available.

Nita, Choreographer, Kettering

AEA provided a detailed, informative, insightful, thorough and well referenced report… balanced recommendations in a non-judgemental and helpful way and steered us into a more informed position.

HR Executive

Very informative. Illuminating info – especially on the law.

Melissa, Teacher, Oxfordshire

Resources

We will continue to add relevant sources/data and articles of particular or outstanding interest. We hope these will be of use.

  • Reports & Papers
  • Articles
  • Videos

The Transition from Sex to Gender in English Prisons: Human Rights and Queer Theory by Michael Biggs

This paper analyses how the prison system in England and Wales transitioned from sex to gender, from the 1990s to the 2010s. It traces the succession of criteria for allocating males to women’s prisons: first genital surgery, then legal sex, and finally gender identity.

Prof Michael Biggs is a member of the AEA Advisory Group.

This Report uses ‘gender’ as a synonym for ‘sex’. This is about the perception of the inequality of females. Women are almost 52% of UK adult population. Because women are ubiquitous in all spheres, the common perception is that equality has been achieved. This Report endorses that perception.

‘Britain ranks 21st in the world for gender equality, and people in Britain are among the least concerned about inequality between men and women, with 23% saying it is one of the most serious forms of inequality in the country.

Other, similar nations that rank higher on objective measures of gender equality actually have greater levels of concern about this issue.’

Read the report from The Policy Institute at Kings College London : Inequalities around the globe: what the world sees as most serious

The Pay Gap

Mandatory Gender Pay Gap Reporting: summary of reported data for 2018/19

Gender Pay Gap: women still short-changed in the UK

Female & Male Social Roles

Gender roles. An incomplete revolution?

Book: ‘Women and Employment. Changing Lives and New Challenges’, eds J Scott, S Dex, H Joshi pub Edward Elgar

Women and Girls in Science

Women in STEM, MATRIX Position Paper, Report May 2018, DfE

Sexism, Rape, Sexual Violence/Assault, Sexual Harassment

OFSTED Review of sexual abuse in schools and colleges (2021)

High levels of sexism fuelling poor mental health among women

‘It’s Just Everywhere – Sexism in Schools’, Report Jan 2019, UK Feminista & NEU

Sexual violence and sexual harassment between children in schools and colleges, Report May 2018, DfE

Large Numbers of Teenage Girls Experience Sexual Coercion in Relationship by Professor Nicky Stanley, University of Central Lancashire

Girls and Low Self-Esteem

The Prince’s Trust, Youth Index 2019, Report Social Media Creates Pressure on Young People

Girls and Self-Harming

‘Prevalence of non-suicidal self-harm and service contact in England, 2000–14: repeated cross-sectional surveys of the general population’, S McManus, D Gunnell, C Cooper, et al, pub The Lancet Psychiatry

‘Worrying rise in reports of self-harm among teenage girls in UK’

Women’s Prisons

The Transition from Sex to Gender in English Prisons: Human Rights and Queer Theory by Michael Biggs

This paper analyses how the prison system in England and Wales transitioned from sex to gender, from the 1990s to the 2010s. It traces the succession of criteria for allocating males to women’s prisons: first genital surgery, then legal sex, and finally gender identity.’ 

Prof Michael Biggs is a member of the AEA Advisory Group.

Equality for women not seen as an issue in the UK

This Report uses ‘gender’ as a synonym for ‘sex’. This is about the perception of the inequality of females. Women are almost 52% of UK adult population. Because women are ubiquitous in all spheres, the common perception is that equality has been achieved. This Report endorses that perception.

‘Britain ranks 21st in the world for gender equality, and people in Britain are among the least concerned about inequality between men and women, with 23% saying it is one of the most serious forms of inequality in the country.

Other, similar nations that rank higher on objective measures of gender equality actually have greater levels of concern about this issue.’

Read the report from The Policy Institute at Kings College London : Inequalities around the globe: what the world sees as most serious

AEA submission to Women and Equalities Select Committee Inquiry: Changing the perfect picture: an inquiry into body image

Read the submission by AEA Alliance (docx file).

Lynn Enright’s experience of intense pain, previously dismissed by medical practitioners, eventually led to a hysteroscopy to examine the inside of her womb. This experience prompted Enright to search for research data on pain and women’s health. She was shocked by how little she found. Her book Vagina: A Re-education is the result – which has won the Hearst Big Book Awards 2019 for ‘Women’s Health Book of the Year’.

Enright found that less than 2.5% of publicly-funded research1 is dedicated solely to reproductive health, despite the fact that one in three women in the UK2 will suffer from a reproductive or gynaecological health problem. She also found that there is five times more research into erectile dysfunction, which affects 19% of men, than into premenstrual syndrome, which affects 90% of women3.

1. UK Health Research Analysis 2014, UK Clinical Research Collaboration 2015
2.  Survey reveals women experience severe reproductive health issues
3.  Why do we still not know what causes PMS?

‘Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men’ – by Caroline Criado Perez, reviewed by Joan Smith, Literary Review, Mar 2019

“Invisible Women” appears at a moment when our rights are under attack, not least in the USA, where the arrival of the Trump administration has given fresh wind to attempts to restrict abortion. Anyone who doubts that we live in a world designed by and for men needs to read this book, with its implicit message that even what we’ve won so far can never be taken for granted.

Excerpt from Literary Review article by Joan Smith

Read the full review or buy the book from independent online bookseller, Hive.co.uk

Getting Brain Sex Wrong – by Professor Sophie Scott

Brief overview of some the neuroscience of sex differences in the human brain, and how complex and non linear these often are. Other than overall size, it is hard to simply discriminate a male and female brain. Professor Scott is a member of the Authentic Equity Alliance Advisory Group.
Play Video